Past Permaculture Photographs

There are lovely photographs I have not shared with you! These are all from my Permaculture Design Certificate course in Columbiaville, MI in the summer of 2009.

From PDC Aug 09

This was the first time I’d seen teasel. One of the earliest fiber prep tools – you can see the resemblance to cards for aligning fiber, or a stiff brush to raise nap. This seedhead dried to a lovely stiff tan and still resides in my craft room.

From PDC Aug 09

Detail of a bark wigwam at The Willows.

From PDC Aug 09

The inner bark of the Basswood / Linden / Lime tree makes a lovely strong cordage. This was conveniently harvested for us by car tires running over the fallen branches. At The Willows.

From PDC Aug 09

A lean-to roof in the process of being thatched. This was absolutely so much fun to do, and as I worked above my head, I ended up with plenty of scratches on my forearms to show off with the pride of a 3-year-old. At the Straw Bale Studio.

From PDC Aug 09

Someone else was interested in the lecture.

(Chicken forage planted where the chickens have access to it directly means less food you have to bring to them.)

 
From PDC Aug 09

Morning at the Land Stewardship Center, where we camped.

From PDC Aug 09

Some geese camped with us.

From PDC Aug 09

Does anyone know what these gorgeous 5-foot-tall flowers are?

 

You can identify a permaculturist’s house by the candy left on the pillow. The lovely Holly hosted me two nights during my travels.

Most efficient refrigerator ever

So, air is affected by gravity, right? And cold air sinks and hot air rises, and all that stuff? Which makes upright refrigerators and freezers seem rather poorly designed – you open the door, pull stuff out, and the cold air falls out with it, then you must spend more money recooling the new air it’s been replaced with. Have you seen the refrigerator freezer compartments that were designed as a wire-bottomed drawer that pulls entirely out of the chilled area? Worse than no front,  it’s now no bottom and sides… you can feel the cold air spill out over the floor as you open the drawer. (The fridge that came with my house is like this.)

So someone finally has solved this design problem, in a way that is sensible and do-it-yourself  – by taking an ordinary chest freezer and rigging up a thermostat to let him bring the temperature up to refrigerated range. All the air stays inside the chest during use, meaning the cost of rechilling new air is minimized. He estimates it would take only $5/year of grid power to run. (Read the article at the second link, it’s quite intriguing!)

I totally need one of these. It won’t fit into the layout of my existing kitchen, but it’s going in my Hypothetical Homestead Plan.